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Media Center

Sourcing wireless is about good deals, not winning "Boss of the Month"

You could win a popularity contest by picking the smartphone your employees are all clamoring for. But that would limit your choice of suppliers and hurt your chance to get a good deal.


So what do you do? Recognize that the wireless market is constantly changing, and your wireless procurement is designed to give you and your end-users options they can live with (or choose from) for at least a couple of years. It’s not about the hot item of the moment.
 
A cost modeling process is required to evaluate proposals in a way that covers all variables. What’s obvious when you isolate one cost may not be so obvious when you bring them all together. Employees may cite individual applications or capabilities (such as one carrier’s acquiescence in “free” WiFi international calls placed over the Internet), but that’s only part of the story.

Communicating with end-users during the process so that they end up with sufficient options for devices and plans, but not a plethora of expensive choices, is the way to get the best financial outcome from your wireless RFP. Wireless procurements in 2010 are a great example of the holistic nature of today’s telecom management.